3 units

Working in teams, students apply skills acquired in their graduate program to consulting projects with a live client. Teams of several graduate students will finalize scope and plan and execute a project for an organization to deliver value to them. Teams will have support from the Eller Business Consulting department, the BCOM department, and a faculty member who is a relevant subject matter expert. The learning objectives include (1) learning how companies make decisions in real, time-constrained, often politically charged environments, (2) applying skills and knowledge gained from the classroom to a business situation or problem, (3) learning and using project and client management skills, and (4) communicating findings and recommendations in a professional manner.

3 units

This course introduces students to the concepts and practices of healthcare information systems, including: (1 ) introduction to the health IT discipline; (2 ) major applications and commercial vendors; (3 ) decision support methods and technologies; (4 ) information systems design and engineering; and (5 ) new opportunities and emerging trends. A semester-long group project will provide students hands-on experience in planning and building healthcare information systems; associated ethical and legal concerns, software engineering and human-computer interaction issues, and user acceptance and outcomes evaluation methods will also be discussed.

3 units

The course begins with a discussion of techniques and notations for object-oriented modeling. Building on these modeling techniques, we will then discuss strategies for implementing reusable and extensible systems and in particular design patterns—templates for software design that have been proved to deliver great practical value. The course will also cover a selected set of software engineering and project management issues and the current thinking on what constitutes the best practice to deal with these issues. 

3 units

This course provides an overview of the methods, processes, and functions necessary for effective communication in today's high tech, global marketplace. Objectives include developing an understanding of the need for and the requisite skills of competent communication in both physical and electronic environments. 

Note: Not open to non-degree seeking students.

3 units

This course introduces data structures and algorithms that are suited for developing Internet-based information systems in business intelligence, search engines, digital libraries, knowledge management systems, web/data/text mining, national security, and biomedical informatics. The course contains lectures, readings, programming assignments, lab sessions, and a large-scale, hands-on system development project. The course will begin with select fundamental yet useful data structures (e.g., stacks, queues, lists, trees and graphs) and sorting and searching algorithms. Newer and more robust web/data/text mining algorithms (e.g., neural networks, decision trees, genetic algorithms, spreading activation, information retrieval, natural language processing) are then introduced in the context of modern and emerging information systems in business, engineering, and bioinformatics. 

Prerequisites: Java programming

3 units

Broad survey of the individual, organizational, cultural, social and ethical issues provoked by current and projected uses of networked computers on the Internet. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper.

3 units

This course will integrate many business foundations in support of MIS students in the MS program. In today's environment, IT solutions have to support the competitive needs of organizations and recognize the inter-organizational nature of business processes. In addition, they must support the financial well-being of a firm as well as its responsibility to various stakeholders. The course is organized into five modules: (1) business strategy in a global environment, (2) process analysis and re-design in an ever expanding value chain, (3) IT in support of these business processes, (4) economic justification, and (5) social implications. 

Note: Not open to non-degree seeking students.

This course covers using controls to protect information assets. Topics include internal and external IT auditing, the role of auditing in information security, the IT audit process, system-independent IT audit processes, system-dependent IT audit processes, and auditing outsourced IT systems and resources. Controls covered will include desktop computer controls, systems development controls, computer center operation controls, assurance of information related to online, client-server, web-based, internet, cloud computing, virtualization and other advanced computer topics. Students will learn approaches to evaluating and addressing technology risk throughout the organization from the perspective of internal and external audit in addition to the view of end users.

Topics included in the class include coverage of all areas to prepare students to take the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) exam.

3 units

This course exposes the student to a broad range of computer systems and information security topics. It is designed to provide a general knowledge of measures to insure confidentiality, availability, and integrity of information systems. Topics range from hardware, software and network security to INFOSEC, OPSEC and NSTISS overviews. Components include national policy, threats, countermeasures, and risk management. Graduate-level requirements include an oral case study report as the final project.  

3 units

The objective of MIS 516 is to provide University of Arizona students with a thorough and operational knowledge of information security so that this critical area is recognized as a management issue and not an IT. issue. 

3 units

The information security arena contains a broad array of multi-level models for assessing, planning, implementing and monitoring the mitigation of security risks. At the very core of this information security spectrum are the actual system and network devices which store, manage, transmit and secure information. This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of issues and techniques surrounding the proper safeguarding of operating systems and related components. Filled with Information Assurance topics, this course offers a solid base for system administrators and technical managers. 

3 units

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems represents integrated strategy for management of information among organizations, suppliers and customers. Graduate-level requirements include completion of a group project on an advanced complementary or enabling technology using ERP. Students' projects include implementation or demonstration and presentation to class.

3 units

With the increased challenges from terrorism, the need to protect against security threats is growing. Thus, it is becoming increasingly necessary to find innovative and better ways to protect ourselves from these security threats. Finding less invasive techniques of detection suggests analyzing people's behavior or the ways/patterns in which they talk/write and identify cues to detect deception and the intent of deception. Also, this procedure needs to be automated using software tools and techniques because of the infeasibility of the manual approach for deployment of these techniques on a large scale. Thus our focus in this course is geared towards developing software tools and techniques dealing with the automatic deception and intent. The course will be project-based involving exchange of ideas, opportunities, challenges, and research issues as well as development of software tools and techniques, in the area of detection of deception and intent, primarily based on the current research work being done at the Center for the Management of Information (CMI) at the University of Arizona. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings at graduate difficulty and detail level with class projects oriented toward a Masters' project or Ph.D. dissertation.

3 units

This course introduces the student to fundamentals of database analysis, design, and implementation. Emphasis is on practical aspects of business process analysis and the accompanying database design and development. Topics covered include: conceptual design of databases using the entity relationship model, relational design and normalization, SQL and PL/SQL, web based database design, and implementation using Oracle or some other modern Database Management Systems. Students are required to work with a local client organization in understanding their business requirements, developing a detailed set of requirements to support business processes, and designing and implementing a web based database application to support their day-to-day business operations and decision making. Students will acquire hands-on experience with a state-of-the-art database management system such as Oracle or Microsoft SQLServer, and web-based development tools. 

3 units

This course provides an understanding and application of system analysis and design processes centered on the systems development life cycle. Core topics include:

  • project management and cost-benefit analysis
  • information systems planning and project identification and selection
  • requirements collection and structuring
  • process modeling
  • conceptual and logical data modeling
  • database design and implementation
  • design of the human-computer interface (HCI)
  • system implementation
  • system maintenance and change management

Students will also be introduced to comparative development methodologies and modeling tools. The course involves a substantial project where students will learn the importance of effective communication and integration with users and user systems. The course emphasizes interpersonal skill development with clients, users, team members, and others associated with development, operation, and maintenance of systems. 

3 units

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking requirements, including networking technologies, hardware, and software. This course has two objectives. First, it focuses on basic networking standards and protocols. Second, students will learn to evaluate, select, and implement different data network options and prepare a cost-benefit analysis for a proposed solution. 

3 units

Corporations today are said to be data rich but information poor. For example, retailers can easily process and capture millions of transactions every day. In addition, the widespread proliferation of economic activity on the Internet leaves behind a rich trail of micro-level data on consumers, their purchases, retailers and their offerings, auction bidding, music sharing, so on and so forth.

Data mining techniques can help companies discover knowledge and acquire business intelligence from these massive datasets. This course will cover data mining for business intelligence. Data mining refers to extracting or “mining” knowledge from large amounts of data. It consists of several techniques that aim at discovering rich and interesting patterns that can bring value or “business intelligence” to organizations. Examples of such patterns include fraud detection, consumer behavior, and credit approval. The course will cover the most important data mining techniques—classification, clustering, association rule mining, visualization, prediction—through a hands-on approach using XL Miner and other specialized software, such as the open-source WEKA software. 

2 units

Organizations use their operations to achieve their strategic objectives. While operations can be diverse, they have characteristics in common. This course focuses on those common attributes. The class will focus on managing processes, inventory, supply chain management, and the integration of operations with strategic issues.

3 units

Visualizing data is an important step in understanding data, exploring relationships, and "making a case." The goal of this class is to introduce students to principles and tools of data visualizations, and create visualizations using appropriate tools for two different but related purposes: (1) exploration; and (2) presentation. The first part is about trying to understand the data and test hypotheses that drive the data visualization effort, and formulate a story; the second part is to convey that finding to others in a convincing manner.

3 units

Operational aspects of quality improvement. Topics include statistical process control and quality management programs. Graduate-level requirements include a report.

3 units

Productive systems, including service type industries; activities entailed in selecting, designing, operating, controlling, and updating systems. Forecasting, aggregate planning, MRP, inventory models under uncertainty, scheduling. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or program.

3 units

Productive systems, including service type industries; activities entailed in selecting, designing, operating, controlling and updating systems. Topics include strategy and competition, supply chain management, project management, facilities layout and location, quality and assurance, and reliability and maintainability Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or program.

3 units

Prerequisite(s): Introductory course in operations management or permission of instructor

Organization, management and control of material flow processes; logistical strategies and relationships of procurement, handling, warehousing, transportation, and inventory control. Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or program.

3 units

Project Management is the application of knowledge, analytical skills, scheduling software tools and techniques related to various project activities in order to meet project requirements. This course specifically addresses the nine project management "knowledge areas", the five project management "process groups" and the 4-way constraints of project management (i.e., scope, time, cost, quality). Graduate-level requirements include an additional term paper or team-based PM Project with a real organization. 

This course is designed to help master-level graduate students develop necessary skills of collecting, storing and managing, exploring, processing and computing big data for business purposes. Topics covered in this course will include big data collection for business, data management with SQL and NoSQL based technologies, data exploration and preprocessing for analytics, data dashboards for business, distributed data storage and computing, and big data based machine learning systems. This course will use state-of-the-art data management, data exploration and computing, and big data machine learning software tools (such as SQL Server, MongoDB, PySpark and TensorFlow) to provide hands-on experience. Students will learn how to apply big data techniques to sift through large amounts of data and provide actionable business insights. 

2 units

The primary objective of this course will be to develop the necessary perspective and strategic information systems (IS) knowledge to help you succeed in a technology-intensive corporate environment. While fundamental technologies are typically available to all corporations, excellence in the efficiency and effectiveness of IS decision making, deployment, and utilization can result in significant economic benefits. This course is necessarily a survey (i.e., breadth, not depth) type of course aimed at preparing the business professional to think strategically, creatively, and critically about the use of IS in business settings. A key goal of the course is to equip the business professional with the tools necessary to analyze business situations, recommend IS solutions to address them, and prepare plans for their implementation.

3 units

The amount of data in our world has been exploding, resulting in what is popularly known as Big Data. At least three major forces are driving the interest and growth in Big Data (1) a rapid increase in the amount of data being generated on the internet, (2) the evolving strategy of firms to collect data from sources both internal and external along the entire product and process lifecycle, and (3) the phenomenal growth of social media, mobile applications, and sensor based technologies as well as the Internet of Things. All of these forces are generating a flood of data which is increasing in volume, variety and velocity. The objective of this course is to introduce students to Data Science techniques to collect, process, visualize and analyze all kinds of "Big Data". It will provide training to those interested in becoming Data Scientists. The course will delve into Web analytics and students will be exposed to tools such as Google analytics and participate in a Google Online Challenge to compete for awards. Topics related to network analysis techniques will be covered in detail where students will learn how to construct, mathematically analyze and visualize different types of networks. Additionally, students will also learn about using MongoDb, Hadoop, and executing map-reduce jobs to process and analyze large datasets collected from social media sites such as Twitter, Youtube, and Facebook.

3 units

Prerequisite(s): MIS 531 or an equivalent database course

The objective of this course is to give students a broad overview of managerial, strategic and technical issues associated with Business Intelligence and Data Warehouse design, implementation, and utilization. Topics covered will include the principles of dimensional data modeling, techniques for extraction of data from source systems, data transformation methods, data staging and quality, data warehouse architecture and infrastructure, and the various methods for information delivery. Critical issues in planning, physical design process, deployment and ongoing maintenance will also be examined. Students will learn how data warehouses are used to help managers successfully gather, analyze, understand and act on information stored in data warehouses. The components and design issues related to data warehouses and business intelligence techniques for extracting meaningful information from data warehouses will be emphasized. The course will use state-of-the-art data warehouse and OLAP software tools to provide hands-on experience in designing and using Data Warehouses and Data Marts. Students will also learn how to gather strategic decision making requirements from businesses, develop key performance indicators (KPIs) and corporate performance management metrics using the Balanced Scorecard, and design and implement business dashboards. 

1 unit

Specialized work, consisting of individual training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.

3 units

True leadership begins from within. What do General Colin Powell, Martin Luther King, Mahatma Gandhi, and thousands of remarkable leaders have in common? Their leadership comes from their natural self-expression, integrity and unwavering commitment to creating the future. This course will help you find and access the "authentic leader" inside you.

3 units

The purpose of this course is to deliver an Information Technology (IT) project to an actively engaged client. The course leverages project management, information evaluation, and other project implementation techniques to assist the students in managing, executing, presenting, and documenting a quality IT project.

3 units

Prerequisite(s): MIS531, MIS541

Students will integrate their knowledge from their program of study and apply it to a problem area in MIS. Each student will write a significant report based on the results of his or her work.