Center for Leadership Ethics Research

 

The Center for Leadership Ethics is committed to fostering research that advances our understanding of ethical issues at multiple levels within or between organizations.

A core function of the Center is to develop and disseminate practical and important ethics research through the application of social scientific research methods, emphasizing quantitative data analysis and experimental design. Our goal is to establish the Eller College as a leader in ethics research among our peer institutions and within the community, primarily through publication in top-tier journal outlets.

Small Grant Funding for Ethics Research

To reach our goal of establishing Eller as a leader in ethics research, the Center offers small grant funding to help leverage department and college investments in ethics research, particularly as it relates to business. However, funding is contingent on the resources available through the Center.

Call for Proposals for 2018-2019

The Center for Leadership Ethics is committed to fostering research that advances our understanding of ethical issues at multiple levels within or between organizations. We will offer small grant funding each semester to help leverage department and college investments in ethics research, particularly as it relates to business. Ethics research often focuses on lying, cheating and stealing. However, we are open to research proposals on a wide variety of topics such as whistleblowing, ethical climate and culture and deviance. Our goal is to establish the Eller College as a leader in ethics research among our peer institutions and within the community.

A maximum of $4,000 per project is available to fund research that meets the above criteria. The total funds available amount to $8,000 for Management and Organizations.

Guidelines for submitting funding proposals are as follows:

  1. Full-time tenure track faculty of all ranks and full-time doctoral students in the Department of Management and Organizations are eligible.

  2. Applications should not exceed one single-spaced page. Proposals should state an explicit research question(s) and associated methodology, as well as a clear breakdown of how the funds will be allocated (preferably in table format).

  3. Awards may not be used as a salary or compensation supplement for the awardee, nor can it be used for conference expenses, and all expenses must be documented.
  4. Applications will be accepted until October 15, 2018. Awards will be announced by October 16, 2018.
  5. If a proposal is accepted, and the faculty or PhD student does not open an operational advance by January 1, 2019, he or she will forfeit funding and will need to re-apply.
  6. Applications should be directed to Aleksander Ellis, Robbins Chair in Organizational Behavior, via email to ellis@eller.arizona.edu.

Sponsored Publications 

Welsh, D.T., Mai, K.M., & Ellis, A.P.J. (in press). How perpetrator gender influences reactions to premeditated versus impulsive unethical behavior: A role congruity approach. Journal of Business Ethics.

Goldman, B., Cooper, D. A., & Kugler, T. (in press). Crime and punishment: A realistic group conflict theory approach to racial discrimination in hiring convicted felons. International Journal of Conflict Management.

Schilke, O., & Rossman, G. (2018). It's only wrong if it's transactional: Moral perceptions of obfuscated exchange. American Sociological Review, 83, 1079-1107.

Gabriel, A.S., Butts, M.M., Yuan, Z., Rosen, R.L., & Sliter, M.T. (2018). Further understanding incivility in the workplace: The effects of gender, agency, and communion. Journal of Applied Psychology, 103, 362-382.

Welsh, D.T., Mai, K.M., Ellis, A.P.J., & Christian, M.S. (2018). Overcoming the effects of sleep deprivation on unethical behavior: An extension of integrated self-control theory.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 76, 142-154.

Motro, D., & Ellis, A.P.J. (2017). Boys, don’t cry: Gender and reactions to negative performance feedback. Journal of Applied Psychology, 102, 227-235.​

Liu, A.X., Liu, Y., & Luo, T. (2016). What drives a firm's choice of product recall remedy? The impact of remedy cost, product hazard, and the CEO. Journal of Marketing, 80(3), 79-95.

Mai, K.M., Ellis, A.P.J., Christian, J.S., & Porter, C.O.L.H (2016). Examining the effects of turnover intentions on OCBs and deviance behavior: A psychological contract approach. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101(8), 1067-1081.​  

Mai, K.M., Ellis, A.P.J., & Welsh, D.T. (2015). The grey side of creativity: Exploring the role of activation in the link between creative personality and unethical behavior. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology , 60, 76-85.

Cooper, D. A., Connolly, T., & Kugler, T. (2015). Lay personality theories in interactive decisions: Strong beliefs, weak evidence. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, 28, 201-213.

Welsh, D.T., Ordóñez, L.D., Snyder, D.G., & Christian, M.S. (2015). The slippery slope: A self-regulatory examination of the cumulative effect of minor ethical transgressions. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100, 114-127.

Christian, J.S., & Ellis, A.P.J. (2014). The crucial role of turnover intentions in transforming moral disengagement into deviant behavior at work. Journal of Business Ethics, 119, 193-208.

Welsh, D.T., Ellis, A.P.J., Mai, K.M., & Christian, M.S. (2014). Building a self-regulatory model of sleep deprivation and deception: The role of conformity and caffeine. Journal of Applied Psychology, 99, 1268-1277.

Welsh, D.T. & Ordóñez, L.D. (2014). Conscience without cognition: The effects of subconscious priming on ethical behavior. Academy of Management Journal, 57, 723-742.

Welsh, D.T. & Ordóñez, L.D. (2014). The dark side of consecutive high performance goals: Linking goal setting, depletion, and unethical behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 123, 79-89. 


Select Media Mentions

"Women Experience More Incivility at Work-Especially from Other Women" Harvard Business Review, March 28, 2018 

"Women at Work Are Meaner to Each Other Than Men Are to Female or Male Co-workers" Newsweek, March 1, 2018  

"Why Your Creative Friends and Co-Workers Can Be So Deceptive" Psychology Today, July 29, 2015 

"The Slippery Slope of Getting Away With Small Stuff" BBC, August 7, 2014

"Stealing a Pen at Work Could Turn You on to Much Bigger Crimes" Huffington Post, June 26, 2014

"Coffee, Naps and Ethical Work Behavior" Chicago Tribune, May 9, 2014

"You Have a Moral Obligation to Drink Coffee: Science" Huffington Post, May 1, 2014

“Setting Consecutive Difficult Goals Has a Dark Side” Harvard Business Review, February 5, 2014