Be WEller - Eller Undergraduate Student Wellness

 

The Eller College of Management is committed to students’ overall health and wellness throughout their Eller experience. Our goal is to provide all students in the Eller College with the resources and support to be healthy and perform at the highest level personally, academically, and professionally. Through the Be wEller Student Wellness initiative, students and staff of the Eller college create programs and support access to resources to foster wellness amongst our entire community.

Life Management Counseling Services

Eller undergraduate students can speak with Melissa Rosinski, a licensed, professional counselor who can provide no-cost, short-term, confidential counseling. As a Life Management Counselor, Rosinski works with Eller undergraduate students to address:

  • Anxiety (stress that interferes with daily functioning)
  • Depression/Low mood
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Grief and loss
  • Life transitions
  • Overwhelming emotions or traumatic stress
  • Interpersonal conflicts (e.g., with a family member, partner, peer, employer, professor, etc.)
Schedule an appointment with Melissa Rosinski through eSMS or email her at lmc@eller.arizona.edu.

Helpful Resources for Uncertainty and Stress

Source: American Psychological Association

  • Be kind to yourself. Some people are better at dealing with uncertainties than others, so don’t beat yourself up if your tolerance for unpredictability is lower than a friend’s. Remind yourself that it might take time for the stressful situation to resolve, and be patient with yourself in the meantime.
  • Reflect on past successes. Chances are you’ve overcome stressful events in the past–and you survived! Give yourself credit. Reflect on what you did during that event that was helpful, and what you might like to do differently this time.
  • Develop new skills. When life is relatively calm, make a point to try things outside your comfort zone. From standing up to a difficult boss to trying a new sport, taking risks helps you develop confidence and skills that come in handy when life veers off course.
  • Limit exposure to news. When we’re stressed about something, it can be hard to look away. But compulsively checking the news only keeps you wound up. Try to limit your check-ins and avoid the news during vulnerable times of day, such as right before bedtime.
  • Avoid dwelling on things you can’t control. When uncertainty strikes, many people immediately imagine worst-case scenarios. Get out of the habit of ruminating on negative events.
  • Take your own advice. Ask yourself: If a friend came to me with this worry, what would I tell her? Imagining your situation from the outside can often provide perspective and fresh ideas.
  • Engage in self-care. Don’t let stress derail your healthy routines. Make efforts to eat well, exercise and get enough sleep. Many people find stress release in practices such as yoga and meditation.
  • Seek support from those you trust. Many people isolate themselves when they’re stressed or worried. But social support is important, so reach out to family and friends.
  • Control what you can. Focus on the things that are within your control, even if it’s as simple as weekly meal planning or laying out your clothes the night before a stressful day. Establish routines to give your days and weeks some comforting structure.
  • Ask for help. If you’re having trouble managing stress and coping with uncertainty on your own, ask for help.

Local and National Resources

  • University of Arizona Counseling and Psychological Services: 520-621-3334
  • Pima County Community Crisis Line: 520-622-6000
  • Crisis TEXT Line–Text HOME to 741741
  • National Suicide Prevention Line: 1-800-273-8255